Technology

In reversal, CES gadget show to go online-only in 2021, Technology News, ETtech

In reversal, CES gadget show to go online-only in 2021
CES, one of the world’s biggest technology conferences, will be a virtual event in January due to the coronavirus pandemic, a reversal from May when organizers said it would go on as a smaller gathering in Las Vegas.

The announcement Tuesday is another blow for Las Vegas which, like all other U.S. tourist destinations, is suffering as people stay home or vacation locally. More than 170,00 people attended the four-day show this year in January, before Covid-19 began to spread across the U.S.

States in the South and West are being hit particularly hard.

In Nevada over the past two weeks, the rolling average number of daily new cases has increased 27%. The state now ranks sixth in the country for new cases of COVID-19 per capita.

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Ant Group – the $200bn technology titan you’ve never heard of

 Jack Ma, founder and CEO of the Alibaba Group - Jacques Brinon /Earns Alibaba
Jack Ma, founder and CEO of the Alibaba Group – Jacques Brinon /Earns Alibaba

He is known for his lavish parties and eccentric tastes. In the past Jack Ma, the 55 year-old billionaire founder of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba, has attended the group’s annual company festivals dressed up as a punk rocker or as Michael Jackson.

But the public float of his second company, Ant Group, could turn out to be his biggest extravaganza yet.

The forthcoming listing of the payments firm, which was announced on Monday, is expected to value it at $200bn (£158bn) – making it easily the most valuable listing of 2020 anywhere in the world.

Ant Group, formerly Ant Financial, provides mobile payments services across China and further afield with 1 billion users. Its products include mobile payments apps, backend payment services and digital wallets and is the market leader in China’s $16tn digital payments industry.

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Quibi wins round in mobile technology fight with rival

Quibi CEO Meg Whitman and Chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg inside the company's Hollywood office. <span class="copyright">(Christina House / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Quibi CEO Meg Whitman and Chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg inside the company’s Hollywood office. (Christina House / Los Angeles Times)

After months of scrutiny from outsiders over its business, Hollywood streaming service Quibi on Monday got some legal relief.

Tech rival Eko had accused Quibi of infringing on a patent with a feature on its app called “turnstyle,” and asked an L.A. federal court judge to block Quibi from using it. On Monday, Judge Christina A. Snyder denied the request for a preliminary injunction.

“In short, Eko fails to make a clear showing of irreparable harm suffered by way of reputation and goodwill,” Snyder said in her decision.

Eko, a New York-based tech firm, sued Quibi in March for patent infringement and misappropriation of trade secrets. Eko said that “turnstyle,” which allows Quibi users to rotate their smartphones to change their viewing perspective on shows, copied Eko’s technology.

But

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Did Quibi steal mobile technology? A rival wants the court to stop it from using ‘trade secrets’

A scene from "The Coop," an interactive murder mystery reality TV show on Eko. <span class="copyright">(Eko)</span>
A scene from “The Coop,” an interactive murder mystery reality TV show on Eko. (Eko)

The legal fight over Quibi’s mobile technology escalated on Wednesday as technology company Eko requested an injunction to block Hollywood’s newest streaming service from using a feature on its app.

Eko, a New York-based company, says that Quibi’s app has a feature that uses technology stolen from Eko. The Quibi feature, called “turnstyle,” allows users to toggle their mobile phones vertically and horizontally to gain a different perspective on videos.

Eko sued Quibi for patent infringement and misappropriation of trade secrets last month in federal court in Los Angeles, alleging that Quibi employees had access to Eko’s trade secret technology under nondisclosure agreements.

And on Wednesday, Eko said it would ask the court to stop Quibi from using Eko’s “trade secret information and from selling, offering for sale, marketing or using the Turnstyle feature.”

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How Mobile Technology May Help Kids Learn to Recognize Emotions in Faces

An essential social skill is understanding emotion. Children learn about emotion even before language by paying attention to a caregiver’s face. Watching people around them provides children with essential facts for survival: Who will love me? Whom should I be scared of?

These days everyone’s seen infants and toddlers, and their parents, with screens in their faces. So how could little ones be getting the critical in-person, face-to-face interaction they desperately need in those early years?

Yet in today’s world, just about everyone uses devices to communicate with others, even face to face. Toddlers learn from video chatting with their grandparents, and teens devour image-driven social media on platforms such as Instagram and Snapchat.

What if, rather than stunting the emotional skills traditionally learned from in-person interactions, the hours kids spend staring at screens and sharing selfies with friends actually teach them to read emotion in facial expressions?

My

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