People

China’s $160 Bn Livestreaming App For ‘Ordinary People’

On Lu Kaigang’s feed, sheets of tarp are transformed into haute couture as China’s mountainous backdrop becomes his catwalk, a 22-year-old villager sashaying to fame via a video-sharing app for the everyman — Kuaishou.

Lu is one of hundreds of millions of users uploading short clips to the app, which propelled its parent company to a $5.4 billion initial public offering last week.

But while its competitor Douyin — the Chinese version of TikTok — is famed for trendy and typically urban influencers, Kuaishou reaches a different demographic, lassoing in migrant workers and rural Chinese.

Lu uses his colourful video stream to show how everyday materials can be turned into sophisticated clothing, and he has set up an in-app store on his profile.

That traction with a poorer but connected mass market known as “tu wei” in Chinese — meaning “earthy” — resonated on the Hong Kong stock exchange.

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People who believe wild coronavirus conspiracy theories rely on YouTube for most of their information on the pandemic

YouTube
YouTube

Reuters

  • Researchers at King’s College London surveyed over 2,000 people in the UK to study how likely people are to believe conspiracy theories about the coronavirus.

  • People who got their news primarily from social media were more likely to believe conspiracy theories, and the researchers found consuming information on YouTube had the strongest correlation with believing them.

  • People who got their news from social media were also more likely to break quarantine and lockdown rules.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

YouTube viewers are more likely to buy into weird conspiracy theories about the coronavirus than other people who get their news via social media.

That’s according to a new report from researchers at King’s College London delving into the public health risks posed by online conspiracy theories about the pandemic.

The peer-reviewed study was published in the journal Psychological Medicine and surveyed 2,254 people in the

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