Quibi

Quibi wins round in mobile technology fight with rival

Quibi CEO Meg Whitman and Chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg inside the company's Hollywood office. <span class="copyright">(Christina House / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Quibi CEO Meg Whitman and Chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg inside the company’s Hollywood office. (Christina House / Los Angeles Times)

After months of scrutiny from outsiders over its business, Hollywood streaming service Quibi on Monday got some legal relief.

Tech rival Eko had accused Quibi of infringing on a patent with a feature on its app called “turnstyle,” and asked an L.A. federal court judge to block Quibi from using it. On Monday, Judge Christina A. Snyder denied the request for a preliminary injunction.

“In short, Eko fails to make a clear showing of irreparable harm suffered by way of reputation and goodwill,” Snyder said in her decision.

Eko, a New York-based tech firm, sued Quibi in March for patent infringement and misappropriation of trade secrets. Eko said that “turnstyle,” which allows Quibi users to rotate their smartphones to change their viewing perspective on shows, copied Eko’s technology.

But

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Did Quibi steal mobile technology? A rival wants the court to stop it from using ‘trade secrets’

A scene from "The Coop," an interactive murder mystery reality TV show on Eko. <span class="copyright">(Eko)</span>
A scene from “The Coop,” an interactive murder mystery reality TV show on Eko. (Eko)

The legal fight over Quibi’s mobile technology escalated on Wednesday as technology company Eko requested an injunction to block Hollywood’s newest streaming service from using a feature on its app.

Eko, a New York-based company, says that Quibi’s app has a feature that uses technology stolen from Eko. The Quibi feature, called “turnstyle,” allows users to toggle their mobile phones vertically and horizontally to gain a different perspective on videos.

Eko sued Quibi for patent infringement and misappropriation of trade secrets last month in federal court in Los Angeles, alleging that Quibi employees had access to Eko’s trade secret technology under nondisclosure agreements.

And on Wednesday, Eko said it would ask the court to stop Quibi from using Eko’s “trade secret information and from selling, offering for sale, marketing or using the Turnstyle feature.”

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