coronavirus

The coronavirus is pushing telehealth into the mainstream — here’s how traditional healthcare players are using it to retain business now and where the market is headed

 

dh telemed
dh telemed

Business Insider Intelligence

The coronavirus pandemic has been a watershed moment for telehealth — or the use of mobile technology to deliver health-related services, such as remote doctor consultations and patient monitoring — as patients have had to reimagine the ways they seek healthcare.

While telehealth has been on the brink of taking off for years, consumer usage of the tech ticked up slowly before 2020. The coronavirus pandemic has given consumers the push they need to adopt telemedicine on a wide scale — and we expect adoption to keep climbing so long as the pandemic rages on. Once outbreaks became severe in the US, consumers began flocking to telehealth: Telehealth usage among US adults climbed 6 percentage points month-over-month from February 2020 — when 11% of respondents reported having tried telehealth — to March — when 17% said the same, per a survey by CivicScience. And we

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People who believe wild coronavirus conspiracy theories rely on YouTube for most of their information on the pandemic

YouTube
YouTube

Reuters

  • Researchers at King’s College London surveyed over 2,000 people in the UK to study how likely people are to believe conspiracy theories about the coronavirus.

  • People who got their news primarily from social media were more likely to believe conspiracy theories, and the researchers found consuming information on YouTube had the strongest correlation with believing them.

  • People who got their news from social media were also more likely to break quarantine and lockdown rules.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

YouTube viewers are more likely to buy into weird conspiracy theories about the coronavirus than other people who get their news via social media.

That’s according to a new report from researchers at King’s College London delving into the public health risks posed by online conspiracy theories about the pandemic.

The peer-reviewed study was published in the journal Psychological Medicine and surveyed 2,254 people in the

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